Nuremberg Easter Market open till Monday

by Amanda Hayward
Contributing writer
Photo courtesy of Valerie Potapova/Shutterstock.comThe Nuremberg Easter Market is open through Monday in front of the famous Frauenkirche. The market features more than 80 stalls selling everything from household goods, to arts and crafts, to homemade foods.

Photo courtesy of Valerie Potapova/Shutterstock.com
The Nuremberg Easter Market is open through Monday in front of the famous Frauenkirche. The market features more than 80 stalls selling everything from household goods, to arts and crafts, to homemade foods.

Deciding on which Easter markets to visit is tough since there are so many popping up in large and small towns throughout Germany.

One market to consider is the Nuremberg Easter Market, Nuremberg’s oldest market that began in 1318 in Meistersinger city. The market will be open through Monday.

Each year the market is held on the main market square. This year there are about 80 unique stalls that have everything from household goods, to arts and crafts and homemade foods.

In its earlier years, the market developed the name “Pot Market,” or “Häferlesmarkt,” because people could get nearly everything for their daily needs. It wasn’t until 1424 that it became an “official” market. Each year the king would show the Nuremberg crown jewels to the people, and the year he chose to give them to the city as a gift was the year the market became official. Today, a replica of the crown (a part of the crown jewels) is displayed in the city’s town hall for all to see. The original 14th century crown is in Vienna, Austria.

The market has about 80 stalls selling arts and crafts from near and abroad, candles, furniture, curtains and wicker, sweets and snacks of all kinds and cleaning supplies, among other things. The market also features special Nuremberg foods, such as sausages and gingerbread, stands with cooking demonstrations, a bakery stand and a grinding shop for scissors and knives.

The bakery stand features a man baking bread inside a big production tent from morning until afternoon for people to watch, taste and learn. Some people come to the market just for the fresh, traditional baked breads made without any additives or preservatives.

The knife and scissor stand is quite unique as well. People can bring their own knives or scissors to this stand to have them sharpened with a professional knife grinder.

One tradition that makes the Nuremberg market so special is its two-day arts and crafts market held at the town hall. It can be described as a small market inside of a bigger market. Each year artists and/or craftsmen show how their masterpieces are made step-by-step for people to observe. Afterward, visitors have the opportunity to buy the finished products. Any artist or craftsman can come in to show off their skills as long as it’s pre-approved by the city and the craft can be properly presented one step at a time. This year a craftsman is showing people how to make leather bags, which can later be purchased.

The location alone makes the Nuremberg Easter Market worth a visit; the castle scenery, old houses and town surrounding the market make it even more appealing and unique among other Easter markets.

Visitors have to enter through the old castle walls just to get into the city center. Once inside, you are completely surrounded by a historical castle. From there you can either enjoy shopping, explore up and around the castle gardens, or enjoy a drink and bite to eat at one of the beer gardens near the castle.

This year the market started 16 days before Easter so people could prepare and buy their Easter decorations in advance. The market is closed today for Good Friday but will continue through the weekend and on Monday.

Unfortunately, the Easter bunny could not make it this year, but traditionally he shows up for the opening ceremony. The market ends Monday.

For more information about Nuremberg, how to get there and to learn more about the Easter market, visit www.nuernberg.de.

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