Defenders shoot, move, communicate through training

Story and photos by Airman 1st Class Michael Stuart
86th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

The 86th Security Forces Squadron conducted “Shoot, Move, Communicate” training Oct. 10 on Ramstein. The training is applicable to any high-risk situation, including but not limited to hostage scenarios and fire fights.
The 86th Security Forces Squadron conducted “Shoot, Move, Communicate” training Oct. 10 on Ramstein. The training is applicable to any high-risk situation, including but not limited to hostage scenarios and fire fights.

If an unfortunate event occurs on base, such as an active shooter, there needs to be some sort of protection for the public. The 86th Security Forces Squadron is that line of defense on Ramstein.
The 86th SFS is responsible for protecting the people, resources and property on Ramstein 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

“As a defender, you’re ultimately going to be base security whether you’re working as an entry controller at the gates, working flightline security or even patrolling,” said Tech. Sgt. Jacob See, 86th SFS instructor. “Security and law and order are our baseline.”

In order to be an effective unit, security forces conducts training a few times a month to keep their skills sharp. “Shoot, Move, Communicate” training is one of the training sessions that equip defenders with the skills and know-how of what to do in a high-risk scenario.


“This is training where defenders learn to shoot, move and communicate in combat situations,” said Staff Sgt. Jeffery Fitzgerald, 86th SFS instructor. “The skills learned are a great foundation for defenders all across the Air Force.”

An 86th Security Forces Squadron member prepares trainer bullets for trainees during “Shoot, Move, Communicate” training.
An 86th Security Forces Squadron member prepares trainer bullets for trainees during “Shoot, Move, Communicate” training.

During the training, defenders learned different ways to handle a weapon, as well as the correct form for facing movements when their weapon is drawn. Two-man teams moved while simulating engaging an armed enemy. The defenders yelled different strategic terms so they could be on track with their counterparts during the fast paced, but systematic training.

“There’s going to be chaos in every situation, but we can minimize that chaos by not having communication failures with one another,” Fitzgerald said.

The defenders practiced the proper way to hold their weapons in groups before they began shooting
at targets from a stationary position.

Completing training such as this one keeps security forces prepared when a threat presents itself. “Shoot, Move, Communicate” training is just one of the tools security forces used to enhance the overall safety of Ramstein.