Earning their final stripe: Chief master sergeant selects make cut

Photos by Airman 1st Class Lane T. Plummer

Senior leadership across the KMC load onto a bus before they visit Airmen selected to promote to chief master sergeant Dec. 8 on Ramstein. Although the Air Force has been an independent service since 1947, the rank of chief master sergeant did not exist until the authorization of the Military Pay Act of 1958.
Senior Master Sgt. Susan Hale, 86th Medical Squadron command support section operations superintendent, stands with her notification of her promotion to chief master sergeant Dec. 8 at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. Leaders across Ramstein joined the selectees to not only congratulate them, but also to educate them on the tasks and responsibilities ahead.
Brig. Gen. Richard G. Moore Jr., 86th Airlift Wing commander, takes accountability on a bus before he and other senior leaders across the KMC visit Airmen selected to promote to chief master sergeant Dec. 8 on Ramstein. According to Air Force Instruction 36-2618, all chief master sergeants are expected to serve as mentors for noncommissioned officers and junior enlisted members and to serve as advisers to unit commanders and senior officers.
Senior Master Sgt. Mellisa Crawley, 86th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron superintendent, embraces her husband, Chief Master Sgt. Michael Crawley, 86th Force Support Squadron superintendent, after being notified of her promotion to chief master sergeant Dec. 8 on Ramstein. After discovering they were selected for promotion, all selectees came together to celebrate as well as build more relationships with people across the community.
Senior Master Sgt. Susan Hale, 86th Medical Squadron command support section operations superintendent, reacts ecstatically after being notified of her promotion to chief master sergeant Dec. 8 at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center. By congressional mandate, only one percent of the Air Force enlisted corps may hold the rank of chief master sergeant.