Ramstein leadership attends National Day of Mourning


U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. Mark R. August, 86th Airlift Wing commander, and U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Ernesto J. Rendon, 86th AW command chief, look on as members of the Ramstein Air Base Honor Guard prepare to lay a wreath during the Ramstein-Miesenbach National Day of Mourning Ceremony, Nov. 17. The National Day of Mourning is a German holiday where citizens mourn victims of war. The ceremony included NATO armed forces members, local officials and members of the Kaiserslautern community. Photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater
U.S. Air Force Col. Matt Husemann, 86th Airlift Wing Vice Commander, stands in respect before ceremonial wreaths during the City of Kaiserslautern’s National Day of Mourning Ceremony in Kaiserslautern, Nov. 17. Kaiserslautern’s Lord Mayor Dr. Klaus Weichel and the German War Graves Commission invited Ramstein Air Base leadership to attend the ceremony. Known in Germany as Volkstrauertag, the National Day of Mourning is a time to remember the tragedy of war and mourn the victims, and to speak out for peace. Photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker
Maxine Antoniou, event attendee, explains the wreaths of various NATO countries to her children at Ramstein-Miesenbach’s National Day of Mourning Ceremony, Nov. 17. Antoniou, a former Royal Air Force flight lieutenant, has frequented dedication ceremonies over several years with her children in order to teach them about the past and show the importance of the past sacrifices for freedom and peace. Photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor D. Slater
A German military member holds a ceremonial flaming sword during the City of Kaiserslautern’s National Day of Mourning Ceremony in Kaiserslautern, Nov. 17. The National Day of Mourning (Volkstrauertag) is an annual German occasion to remember all victims of war and tyranny. It was established in 1922 and was initially dedicated to the victims of World War I. As with the Sunday of the Dead (Totensonntag), the National Day of Mourning is a “silent day,” which means that in some regions of Germany music and dance events are prohibited. Photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker