Detect, discern, diffuse: EOD does what they do best

by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker
86th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Staff Sgt. Jameson Baehler, right, 786th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal technician, lays down shock tube to trigger an explosive, while Staff Sgt. Geoffrey Hagle, 786th CES EOD technician, transports explosive disarmament equipment during training Aug. 2 on Ramstein Air Base. EOD Airmen train continually to prepare for the days when they are saving lives, and to stay ahead of adversaries.

 

The 786th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal Airmen observe the effects of explosive detonation charges on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, July 6, 2018. EOD members apply classified techniques and special procedures to lessen or remove the hazards created by the presence of unexploded ordnance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker)

 

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jameson Baehler, 786th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal technician, opens a simulated improvised explosive device on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Aug. 2, 2018. Whenever there is any threat or potential threat of danger from explosives on a military establishment, EOD personnel respond to diffuse the threat. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker)

 

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jonathon McCauley, 786th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal technician, operates an F6A reconnaissance robot on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Aug. 2, 2018. To become EOD technicians, Airmen attend a course designed to be physically and mentally grueling at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, where they learn the principles behind recognizing, disarming and neutralizing explosive materials. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker)

 

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jonathon McCauley, right, 786th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal technician, helps Staff Sgt. Jameson Baehler 786th CES EOD technician, don an EOD 9 bomb suit during training on Ramstein Air Base, Germany, Aug. 2, 2018. The suit is designed to increase the wearer’s chance of survival while they are in close contact with explosives. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker)